THE AMERICAN WHIPPET CLUB

 

Donated to the Whippet Community by Don Frames, Bardon Whippets

1963 cover

WHIPPET MOVENT - IT 'S FAULTS AND VIRTUES
by
SAME. HEARN
(From the Northern Counties Whippet Club Year Book)

The American Standard calls for: (Regarding gait) Low, free moving and smooth, as long as commensurate with the size of the dog. A short, mincing gait with high knee action should be severely penalized.

The English standard states: Hindquarters strong and broad across thighs. The stifles well bent, hocks well let down, second thighs strong, the dog then being able to stand over a lot of ground and show great driving power.

The Whippet, having been bred as a running dog, I feel this driving power to be a must. This requirement alone calls for a sound, unrestricted, functional rear end to furnish the forward thrust and enable the dog to travel at the high rate of speed that is required of the coursing dog. I have from time to time, as well as many other breeders, sacrificed this requirement in a dog, for a dog we feel shows a little more type, just a little more extreme dog standing, with more eye appeal and a better chance to win in the show ring under the average all breed judge. This I feel is an injustice to our breed and now is the time for all good breeders to come to the aid of their Whippets.

I am not an anatomist but I have spent many years studying the anatomy of the dog, its movement, and causes of the many irregularities and gait faults of the coursing dog in motion.

Let us start with, in my opinion, the number one fault we see in the American bred Whippet as well as the English bred Whippet today. Cut away rear ends, with a short mincing gait plus high front action. This type of dog is a far pace from the running dog and shows no drive or follow through. Since a dog's gait is governed by the conformation of each individual animal, before we can correct this we must pinpoint the conformation fault that causes this faulty gait, why it causes it, and prove to ourselves we are right in our line of thought. If we breed a well balanced dog, front and rear, with the correct angulation of croup and the correct amount of shoulder lay back, we won't have to worry about the correct gait, for we will have the low moving, long striding Whippet. The cut away rear having been a pet peeve of mine for years, and having found so many different opinions as to how this could and could not be connected with the mincing gait, I have worked out a foolproof demonstration to put over my point and anyone interested can prove this to themselves in a matter, of minutes. Before I explain this demonstration let us acquaint ourselves a little better with just what effect the croup angulation has on the movement of the dog. The slope of the croup is also the pelvic angulation of the dog, we know the hip socket is a part of the pelvis itself, the leg is connected into this socket by the heed of the femoral bone, this being a ball and socket joint the femoral can only move so far in either direction for reach or drive, therefore the slope of the croup or pelvis determines just how far forward the leg can move for reach as well as to the rear for drive, this in turn governs the length of stride with which the dog can move when expending himself. Take a pelvis with about a 27 degree angle, which I consider ideal, you have the same amount of reach as drive, giving you a well coordinated, balanced rear end, however, a dog with an extreme stifle can move fairly well with up to a 32 degree angulated croup and should not be severely penalized. Take a dog with a 40 degree angulated croup or a severely cut away rear and you have a dog with all the reach and no drive, with its driving power stopping at about a 90 degree angle to the femoral socket or straight up and down, a dog losing his power at this point is of no value as a coursing dog, therefore I feel this should be the first fault to be corrected and bred out of Whippets. This fault not only effects the rear gait, the front end on this type of dog is greatly impaired in movement when traveling in a trot. If a dog with this fault and this much rear reach were moving low to the ground in front, which is correct for the breed, he could not prevent interfering, so what happens? The trot being a natural gait of the dog, he learns to compensate to prevent interfering by lifting his feet fast and high in front giving us the hackney front action. Sometimes we see a dog with a good rear that still has the hackney action in front. We have another conformation fault that causes this same action, the steep shoulder. The shoulder not being a ball and socket joint, its movement is still determined by the angulation of the shoulder, its movement limited by the muscles and ligaments that hold it intact. The reach of the front is determined by the angulation of the shoulder same as the rear is determined by the angulation of the croup. This can be proven by the same demonstration that I am about to describe for the rear end.

DEMONSTRATION. Take a piece of lumber (good), 1 in. by 2 in. and 18 in. long. Another piece, 1/2 in. by ½ in. and 18 in. long. Take the 1 by 2, measure off nine inches to the center and draw a line across board, then measure one inch in each direction from the center line and draw lines across the board in each of these locations. Then taking the      in. by 1/2 in. stick, drive one small nail through this 2 in. from the end and into the other board on the center line as near as possible to the top side of the board. With this done take two more small nails driving them into the larger board on the other two lines as near as possible to the bottom edge. This completes the gadget. The 1 by 2 will act as the pelvis or croup and the  by 1 will act as the leg, the two small nails will limit the movement as the hip socket does in the dog. Placing the 1 in. by 2 in. on a 27 degree angle, note the distance the leg will cover while moving from stop to stop. Try this at as many different angles as you like and note the difference you have in reach end drive in relation to the end of the 1 by 2, depending on the slope of the croup, and my point will be proven.

Fellow breeders, let's see what we can do about the gait of our many little friends, the Whippets.


"1963 INTERNATIONAL KENNEL CLUB DRAWS
RECORD RACE ENTRY"
Louis J. Pegram


Speed in quantity and quality should be the theme of Whippet racing in Chicago. Eighty Whippets were entered for racing with three last minute scratches which sent seventy-six speedsters post ward in the first of the four racing programs. The Puppy Race drew twenty-three starters with fifty-three going post ward in the Adult Race group.

Competition was very keen with CHAMPION EYELAND CINNAMON ROLL, owned by Barbara and Ralph Eyles, Antioch, Illinois, taking down top honors in the Adult category over ROUGET O'LAZELAND, owned by Mr. and Mrs. Victor A. Renner, Marysville, Ohio. EYELAND PEPPERMINT BOY, owned by Mrs. E. F. Kornbleith, was third high point winner, with EYELAND HANNAH, owned by Mr. and Mrs. Eyles, taking fourth honors by one point over TRAYMATT FLOOR BOARDS, owned by Josephine and Barbara Steinberg, Antioch, Illinois

Top honors, being based on high score over four races, found CHAMPION CINNAMON ROLL winning three races with a second to ROUGET in the final race on Sunday. ROUGET O'LAZELAND was fouled in the first heat but took second place to Peppermint Boy in that particular race. Rouget won his second heat easily then finished second to CHAMPION CINNAMON ROLL being caught in the last few strides. Rouget won the final heat,but there was some bumping, not fighting, as the field left the starting box with Rouget clear of the bumping. PEPPERMINT BOY certainly was not disgraced, but looked as if he needed racing to regain his championship speed which made him the top racer in the U.S.A. for 1961 and 62. EYELAND HANNAH shows great promise for such a young race bitch. She looked great as a puppy and continues to improve with each start. TRAYMATT FLOOR BOARDS is a consistent racer in top condition -- as were all of the Steinberg-owned and trained racers.

The Puppy Races were also stacked with young quality racers, but STONEY MEADOWS NORA, owned by Mr. and Mrs. Victor Renner, Marysville, Ohio, was much the best and won all four of her heats easily. Nora, once she assumed the lead, continued to draw away from her field with the greatest ease. There was a three-way point tie for second high point honors causing a runoff. STONEY MEADOWS WINNIE won the runoff by a length from RED VARMINT with TRAYMATT NANCY two lengths back in third place. Several young pups did not finish well, but they gained a world of experience and will show great improvement in their next races.

Cooperation was excellent from all Whippet owners present, and this was a real professional race meet in every respect. Eugene Jacobs and Bob Mohrman turned in a perfect job of lure operation and starting box work. The only race rerun was due to a Whippet escaping from the paddock causing Eugene Jacobs to immediately stop the lure at the fifty yard mark. The race was promptly rerun without undue confusion.

Our judging panel was outstanding with no complaints being registered by owners. Alternating judges were Mrs. Hallock du Pont, Mr. C. C.  Fawcett, Dr. James Corbin, Mr.  Donald Hostetter, Mr. William Fields, Mr. Jack Middleton, and Mr. William Schmick. Selwyn Blackstone worked continually to make this our most successful race meeting. Selwyn and his friends did an outstanding job of operating the all important identification board. The electric timer devised by Selwyn was a bit difficult to operate the first few races, but it did a fine job later in the race program. It was interesting to note in the Adult Races the fastest time run over the 160 yard course was 10.2 seconds while the slowest race was 11.5 seconds.

Chase Arnold of Michigan acted as Paddock Judge, and through his fine efforts we were able to get all of the races to the track promptly. Chase made the racing blankets, so if you need racing colors for your local race meetings, just write to him for the same type he made for the Chicago races. Mrs. John Berger and Miss Hanstrom assisted Chase  Arnold with his paddock duties. Much credit should be given to Mrs. Eugene Jacobs in assisting your writer in operating the grading system.

Mrs. Groverman Ellis, President of the International Kennel Club Show for the sixth year in a row, presented the many fine trophies, including "THE DOG WORLD TROPHY" which will remain the property of Mr. and Mrs.  Ralph Eyles for a period of one year. Possibly they will win it again with either HANNAH or CINNAMON ROLL in 1964.

Red Bally, Champaign, Illinois, who was one of the pioneers in starting Whippet racing at the International Kennel Club Show some six years ago, was badly hurt while training his dogs for the International Kennel Club races. Red had his dogs out in the field one night and they flushed a cock pheasant which flew up, striking Red in the head, causing a concussion. I understand Red is doing quite well in the hospital, but it will be some time before he will again be with us. His dogs are the oldest Whippets who have contested each of the first five race meets held in Chicago. On each occasion they have shown exceptionally well and certainly most of the people present hope for a speedy recovery so that Red and his dogs can again be with us in 1964.

Jim Martinez was not able to be with us, but he did send his fine racer and show dog, CHAMPION BRIARWIN'S BLUESTONE, to compete in the races. Bluestone did quite well, but was not in our top group at the end of four races. Last year this racer showed to an exceptionally fine advantage and was one of the high score dogs at the International.

This successful program is just another story of fine cooperation of Whippet owners and members of "The American Whippet Club." Entries for this race meeting came from California, Connecticut, Maryland, Virginia, Texas, Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, and Wisconsin, indicating the great interest in the Whippet as a show and race dog. This was by far our more successful meet and already plans are being laid to make the 1964 edition even more successful than was the case this year.April 19, 1963


 American Whippet Club Midwest Specialty Show April 5, 1963, Judge, Mr. Alva Rosenberg

Puppy Dogs, 6 - 9 no., four shown. First, Barbara & Josephine Steinberg's Traymatt Ponderosa Pine (by Traymatt Plywood ex Traymatt Midsummer Day Dream) Second, Mary Leonard's Eyleland Herringbone (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Meander Ribbons) Third, Claire & Ronald Klemmedson's The Hawk Of Kashan (by Stoney Meadows Peacock Pie ex Ebonwood Goldfinsch O'Kashan) Fourth, Barbara & Josephine Steinberg': Traymatt Woodcut Artist (by Traymatt Plywood ex Traymatt Midsummer Day Dream)

Puppy Dogs, 9 - 12 mo., five shown. First, Mrs. W. P. Wear's Stoney Meadows Golden quest  (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Winston ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Golden Apple) Second, Paul Sykes' Traymatt Nolasco (by Ch. Traymatt Eyleland Herkimer ex Traymatt Necessary Yell) Third, Calvin Perry's Stoney Meadows Marlboro (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Winston ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Snow Queen) Fourth, G. Wood & P. Miller's Eyleland Gregory (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Meander Double or Quits)

Novice Dogs, four shown. First, Louis Pegram's Oldemill Crown Derby (by Ch. Traymatt Eyleland Herkimer ex Ch. Love Letter O'Lazeland) Second, Wm. Schmick & Lazeland Kennels' Lucifer O'Lazeland (by Ch. Beachfire O’Lazeland ex Whipoo's Dark Venture) Third, Catherine Crawford's Eyleland American Flag (by Stoney Meadows Peacock Pie ex Stoney Meadows Erin Tin Tin) Fourth, Thomas Crawford's Mo-Skeet (by Ch. Stoney "endows Red Fox ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Ice Folly)

Bred by Exhibitor Dogs, two shown. First, Lazeland ',Kennels' El Capitan O'Lazeland (by Ch. Ravenslodge Solitaire ex Lorelei O'Lazeland) Second, Jean Refieuna's Johjean O'Lazeland Sleeper J (by Ch. Surfrider O'Lazeland ex Pennyworth Forget-Me-Not)

American Bred Dogs, seven shown. First, Wm. E. Fields' Oberon Of Briskways (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Monocle ex Eyleland Buttercup) Second, Meander Kennels' Eyleland Milliboy (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Ch. Great Circle Bewitched) Third, D. R. Motch's Meander Spit N' Polish (by The Baron of Birdneck Point ex Ch. Whipoo's Showy Luster) Fourth,     Schmick Lazeland .Kennels' El Cid O'Lazeland (by Ch. Ravenslodge Solitaire ex Lorelei O'Lazeland)

Open Dogs, nine shown. First, Ralph Eyles' Eyleland Henry( by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Ch. Great Circle Hester) Second, Barbara & Josephine Steinberg's Traymatt Iron Fly (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Traymatt Necessary Yell) Third, D. R. Motch's Seven League Space Race (by Solar System O' Lazeland ex Ch. Seven League Songbird) Fourth, John Sheehan's Forest Slim Jim (by Ch. Red Letter O'Lazeland ex Harbridge Lovely Lady)
Winners Dog to Eyleland Henry. Reserve to Traymatt Iron Fly.

Puppy Bitches 6 - 9 mo., four shown. First, D. P. Vance & R. J. Crooker's Eyleland Plaid (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Meander Ribbons) Second, Barbara & Ralph Eyles' Eyleland Paisley (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Meander Ribbons) Third, G. Wood & P. Miller's Garretacre Brenda (by Great Circle Merry ex Eyleland Taffia) Fourth, Barbara & Josephine Steinberg's The Lark of Kashan (by Stoney Meadows Peacock Pie ex Ebonwood Goldfinch O'Kashan)


 ADULT RACES: International Kennel Club Show, Chicago, Illinois, April 6 and 7, 1963.Distance 160 yards -- Whippets over one year of age -- number of entries 53 -- four race programs -- 37 races.

 

Whippet Points Whippet Points
1. ..... Ch. E. Cinnaman Roll - Eyles ..... 26
2. ..... Rouget of Lazeland - Renner ..... 21
3. ..... Eyleland Peppermint Boy - Kornbleith ..... 18
4. ..... Eyleland Hannah - Eyles ..... 16
5. ..... Traymatt Floorboards - Steinberg ..... 15
6. ..... Eyleland Homer - Renner ..... 13
7. ..... Ch. B. Blue Stone - Martinez ..... 13
8. ..... Sege Greyflash of B. - Katz ..... 13
9. ..... Ch. S. M. Fairy. Fox - Wear ..... 12
10. ..... Traymatt Rooster Boy - Steinberg ..... 11
11. ..... Laura 0' Lazeland - Berger ..... 11
12. ..... Ch. E. Crescendo - Sykes ..... 11
13. ..... Traymatt Iron Fly - Steinberg ..... 11
14. ..... Moo's Lu Lu - Morgan ..... 11
15. ..... Ch. E. M. Tost - Eyles ..... 11
16. ..... Seven League Spot - Notch ..... 10
17. ..... El Cid O'Lazeland - Schmick ..... 10
18. ..... Ch. H. Highland Fling - Frames ..... 9
19. ..... Lucifer O' Lazeland - Schmick ..... 9
20. ..... S.M. Peacock Pie - Steinberg ..... 9
21. ..... E. American Flag - Crawford ..... 9
22. ..... Ch. H. Hobgoblin - Hastings ..... 9
23. ..... O. Crown Derby - Pegram ..... 9
24. ..... Vara Rasmus - Klemmedson ..... 8
25. ..... Sege Tiger - Blackstone ..... 8
26. ..... Black Shadow - Wucivic ..... 8
27. ..... Blue Bell - Wucivic ..... 8
28. ..... Mr. Corker - Blackstone ..... 7
29. ..... W. Twist of Lemon - Jacobs ..... 7
30. ..... T. E. Easter Egg - Steinberg ..... 7
31. ..... Sege Ebbie - Blackstone ..... 7
32. ..... W. Orange Slice - Jacobs ..... 7
33. ..... Eyleland Pianissimo - Sykes ..... 6
34. ..... Always Tarnish - Pegram ..... 6
35. ..... Mercury Back of the Yards - Swistok ..... 6
36. ..... Untarnished - Pegram ..... 6
37. ..... Sege's Reb - Valdese ..... 6
38. ..... Moc's Spade - Morgan ..... 5
39. ..... Sege Little Silver - Blackstone ..... 5
40. ..... Moc's Fox - Morgan ..... 5
41. ..... Ch. W. White Chiffon - Jacobs ..... 5
42. ..... Serenade O'Lazeland - Doder ..... 5
43. ..... O. L. Royal Dresden - Morgan ..... 5
44. ..... T. Plywood - Steinberg (Int. 4) ..... 4
45. ..... Ch. Red Letter OIL. - Morgan ..... 4
46. ..... E. Mo-Skeet - Crawford (Int. 3) ..... 3
47. ..... El Capitan OIL. - Hostetter ..... 2
48. ..... Hoc's Silver Streak - Morgan ..... 2
47. ..... Ch. G. C. Hester - Eyles (Scr. 3) ..... 2
50. ..... Hasty Hilda - Backman (Int. 2) ..... 2
51. ..... S.M. Vicki - Backman (Int. 1) ..... 0
52. ..... Oberon of B. Fields (Int. 1) ..... 0
53. ..... Ch. Avon Jessica Fields (Int. 1) ..... 0

PUPPY RACES - International Kennel Club Show, Chicago, Illinois, April 6 and 7, 1963. Distance 100 yards -- starters not to exceed 12 months of age -- number of entries 23 -- four race programs -- 16 races.

Whippet Points Whippet Points
1. ..... S.M. Nora - Renner .............................. 20
2. ..... S. M. Winnie - Berger .......................... 13
3. ..... Red Varmint - Pegram ......................... 13
4. ..... Traymatt "Nancy - Mack ..................... 13
5. ..... S.M. Golden Quest - Wear .................. 12
6. ..... Madcap Front and Center - Hostetter 10
7. ..... S.L. Space Race - Motch .................... 10
8. ..... Garrettacre Brenda - Wood- Miller .......9
9. ..... Whipoo's Bronco - Blackstone............ 9
10. ..... E. Double Decker - Pegram ................ 9
11. ..... Double Talk - Pegram ......................... 9
12. ..... Kashan's Chippy - Blackstone .................... 7
13. ..... Limelight O'Lazeland - Hostetter ................. 7
14. ..... Eyleland Paisley - Eyles ................................ 7
15. ..... Avant Cassandra - Fields (Scr. 2) ................ 2
16. ..... Traymatt Nannette - Steinberg (Scr. 3) --..... 1
17. ..... Traymatt Rob - Steinberg ..............................1
18. ..... E. Harringbone - Eyles (Scr. 2) ..................... 1
19. ..... Eyleland Gregory - Wood - Miller .................. 0
20. ..... J. J. Lazeland Sleeper - Refieuna ................ 0
21. ..... J. J. Justa Blue - Refieuna ........................... 0
22. ..... Pirate of Kashan - Klemmedson................... 0
23. ..... Sandpiper of K. - Klemmedson .................... 0

Puppy Bitches 9 - 12 mo., two shown. First, Kathryn & Scott Fields' Avaunt Cassandra (by Oberon of Briskways ex Ch. Whipoo's Avon Jessica) Second, Kennels' Madcap Front and Center (by Ch. Great Circle Skibbereen ex Great Circle Tosca)

Novice Bitches, two shown. First, Louis Pegram's Untarnished (by Whipoo's Bengal ex Ch. Whipoo's Tarnish) Second, Wm. D. Backman's Hasty Hilda (by Stoney Meadows Nicki ex Stoney Meadows Career Girl)

Bred by Exhibitor Bitches, one shown, Lazeland Kennels' Limelight O' Lazeland (by Ch. Surfrider O' Lazeland ex Ch. Whipoo's White Luster)

American Fred Bitches, five shown. First, Betty Lee Hinks' Whipoo's Orange Slice (by Whipoo's Bengal ex Meander Mata Hari) Second, Henry Doder's Serenade O'Lazeland (by Ch. Ravenslodge Solitaire ex Lorelei O' Lazeland) Third, Donald P. Vance's Meander Ribbons (by The Baron of Birdneck Point ex Ch. Whipoo's Showy Luster) Fourth, John Berger's Laura O' Lazeland (by Ch. Ravenslodge Solitaire ex Lorelei O'Lazeland)

Open Bitches, seven shown. First, Mrs. W. P. Wear's Stoney Meadows Beauty Queen (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Winston ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Snow Queen) Second, Cracker— box Kennels' Crackerbox Moonstone (by Royal Coachman O' Lazeland ex Ch. Stoney Meadows 'Moonlight) Third, Mr. & Mrs. Eugene L. Jacobs' Whipoo's Twist Of Lemon (by Whipoo's Bengal ex Ch. Whipoo's Tarnish) Fourth, John H. Berger's Stoney Meadows Winnie (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Winston ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Snow Queen)

Winners Bitch to Stoney Meadows Beauty Queen. Reserve to Whipoo's Orange Slice.

Best of Winners to Stoney Meadows Beauty Queen.

Veteran Dog & Bitch Class, one shown, Mr. & Mrs. Eugene L. Jacobs' Whipoo's Silken Elegance, C. D. (by Ch. Seagift Sunrise of Pennyworth ex Ch. Platinum of Stoney Meadows)

Specials, twelve shown, Ch. Eyleland Cinnamon Roll, Ch. Eyleland Winter Wind, Ch. Stoney Meadows Fairy Fox, Ch. Legend O' Lazeland, Ch. Eyleland Crescendo, Ch. Hollypark Hobgoblin, Ch. Hollypark Highland Fling, Ch. Whipoo's White Chiffon, Ch. Seven League Skyblue Pink, Ch. Eyleland Red Mack, Ch. Whipoo's Avon Jessica, Ch. Seven League Songbird.

Best Of Breed to Barbara & Ralph Eyles' Ch. Eyleland Winter Wind (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Monocle ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Ice Folly) Best Opposite Sex to Calvin C. Perry's Ch. Seven League Skyblue Pink (by Royal Coachman O' Lazeland ex Seven League Boots)

Get Class, one competing, Barbara & Ralph Eyles' Stoney Meadows Epic (by Stoney Meadows Madrigal ex Stoney Meadows Make Believe)

Produce Class, two competing. First, Barbara & Ralph Eyles' Ch. Great Circle Hester (by Great Circle Sand Flea ex Ch. Great Circle Bewitched) Second, Donald P. Vance's Meander Ribbons (by The Baron Of Birdneck Point ex Ch. Whipoo's Showy Luster)


Oklahoma City Kennel Club
March 2, 1963, Judge: Mr. Elbert E. Vary

Open Dogs, one shown, Sam Hearn's Tuff Of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Windswept Thunderbolt ex Briarwyn's Bobby Soxer)

Winners Dog to Tuff Of Blue Beaver.

Open Bitches, two shown. First, Mrs. John Abramst Trio's Maria of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver ex Ch. Dusty Brenda) Second, Gar-Lane Kennels' Gar—Lane Fancy Nancy (by Harbridge Blarney Stone ex Regalaire's Em Gee)

Winners Bitch to Trio's Maria of Blue Beaver. Reserve to Gar—Lane Fancy Nancy.
Best of Winners to Tuff Of Blue Beaver.

Specials, two shown, Ch. Briarwyn's Benjamin, Ch. Tubara's Simply Simon.
Best of Breed to Jack Prenneis Tubara Kennels' Ch. Tubara's Simply Simon (by Choirmaster of Allways ex Ch. Cameo Alabaster) Best Opposite Sex to Trio's Maria of Blue Beaver.


Lawton Fort Sill Kennel Club
March 3, 1963, Judge: Mr. G. A. Plummer

Open Dogs, one shown, Sam Hearn's Tuff of Blue Beaver (by Oh. Windswept Thunderbolt ex Briarwyn's Bobby Soxer)

Winners Dog to Tuff of Blue Beaver.

Puppy Bitches, one shown, Dorothy Schallenmuller's White Lightening (by Ch. Windswept Thunderbolt ex March Heir of Blue Beaver)

Novice Bitches, one shown, White Lightening.

Open Bitches, one shown, Mrs. John Abrams' Trio's Maria of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver ex Ch. Dusty Brenda)

Winners Bitch to Trio's Maria of Blue Beaver. Reserve to White Lightening.
Best Of Winners to Tuff Of Blue Beaver.

Specials, two shown, Ch, Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver, Ch. Tubara's Simply Simon.

Best Of Breed to San Hearn's Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Whipoo's Spattarib of Meander ex Ch. Whipoo's Sharp Focus) Best Opposite Sex to Trio's Maria of Blue Beaver.

Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver went on to win the Hound Group.


Houston Kennel Club
March 17, 1963, Judge: Mr. Herman G. Cox

Open Dogs, two shown. First, John R. Hutchins, Jr.'s Roanbar Son Of Cashalong (by Roanbar Cashalong ex White Fire Princess) Second, Sam Hearn's Tuff Of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Windswept Thunderboly ex Briarwyns Bobby Soxer)

Winners Dog to Roanbar Son Of Cashalong. Reserve to Tuff Of Blue Beaver.

Puppy Bitches, two shown. First, Mrs. Paul McCarley's Briarwyn's Bright Star (by Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver ex Ch. Briarwyn's Bridget)

Open Bitches, two shown. First, John Hutchins, Jr.'s Briarwyn's Blue Chip (by Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver ex Ch. Briarwyn's Bridget) Second, John Hutchins. Jr.'s Whipoo's Copy Cat (by Ch. Lysander of Brisk ways ex Whipoo's Dark Venture)

Winners Bitch to Briarwyn's Blue Chip. Reserve to Whipoo's Copy Cat.
Best Of Winners to Briarwyn's Blue Chip.

Specials, three shown, Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver, Ch. Pennyworth Lumumba, Ch. Canyon Crest's Surprise.

Best Of Breed to Sam Hearn's Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Whipoo's Spattarib of Meander ex Ch. Whipoo's Sharp Focus)

Best Opposite Sex to Canyon Crest Kennels' Ch. Canyon Crest's Surprise (by Canyon Crest's Black Diamond ex Ch. Canyon Crest's Mamie)

Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver went on to place third in the Hound Group.


West Texas Kennel Club, Odessa Texas
March 30, 1963, Judge: Mr. H. P. Saunders

Open Dogs, two shown. First, Sam Hearn's Tuff Of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Windswept Thunderbolt ex Briarwyn's Bobby Soxer) Second, Wallace Harlee, Jr. & Sam. Hearn's Samuel Of Blue Beaver (by Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver ex Briarwyn's Bobo of Blue Beaver)

Winners Dog to Tuff Of Blue Beaver. Reserve to Samuel Of Blue Beaver.

Puppy Bitches, one shown, Mrs. Angus Smith & Mrs. Ken Dunnagan's Ingmar Blue Beaver Butterfly (by Mr. Good Of Blue Beaver ex Bell Ringer Of Blue Beaver)

Open Bitches, one shown, Gar-Lane Kennels' Gar-Lane Fancy Nancy (by Harbridge Blarney Stone ex Regalaire's Emlee)

Winners Bitch to Gar-Lane Fancy Nancy. Reserve to Ingmar Blue Beaver Butterfly. Best of Winners to Tuff Of Blue Beaver.

Specials, three shown, Ch. Canyon Crest's Surprise, Ch. Briarwyn's Benjamin, Ch. Bull O' The Woods Of Blue Beaver.

Best of Breed to Tuff Of Blue Beaver. Best Opposite Sex to Ch. Canyon Crest's Surprise.


International Kennel Club of Chicago
April 6 & 7, 1963 Judge: Mr. William W. Brainard, Jr.

Puppy Dogs, two shown. First, Paul Sykes' Traymatt Nolasco (by Ch. Traymatt Eyleland Herkimer ex Traymatt Necessary Yell) Second, Jean Refieuna & Robert Katchmar's Johjean O'Lazeland Justa Blue (by Ch. Surfrider O' Lazeland ex Pennyworth Forget Me Not)

Novice Dogs, one shown, Catherine Crawford's Eyleland American Flag (by Stoney Meadows Peacock Pie ex Stoney Meadows Brin Tin Tin)

Bred By Exhibitor Dogs, three shown. First, Lazeland Kennels' El Capitan O'Lazeland (by Ch. Ravenslodge Solitaire ex Lorelei O'Lazeland) Second, Gary & Judy Morgan's Moc's Silver Streak (by Ch. Red Letter O'Lazeland ex Harbridge Lovely Lady) Third, Jean H. Refieuna's Johjean O'Lazeland Sleeper J. (by Ch. Surfrider O'Lazeland ex Pennyworth Forget Me Nat)

American Bred Dogs, three shown. First, Margaret & Victor Renner's Eyleland Homer (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Ch. Great Circle Hester) Second, B. R. Motch's Meander Spit N' Polish (by The Baron Of Birdneck Point ex Ch. Whipoo's Showy Luster) Third, Gary & Judy Morgan's Moc's Spade (by Ch. Red Letter O' Lazeland ex Harbridge Lovely Lady)

Open Dogs, six shown, First, Ralph Eyles' Eyleland Henry (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Ch. Greet Circle Hester) Second, Wm. E. Fields' Oberon of Briskways (by Oh. Stoney Meadows Monocle ex Eyleland Buttercup) Third, D. R. Motch's Seven League Space Race (by Solar System O'Lazeland ex Ch. Seven League Songbird) Fourth, Victor Renner's Rouget O' Lazeland (by Royal Coachman O' Lazeland ex Lorelei O’Lazeland )

Winners Dog to Eyleland Henry. Reserve to Traymatt Nolasco.

Puppy Bitches, three shown. First, Barbara & Ralph Eyles' Eyleland Paisley (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Meander Ribbons) Second, John H. Berger's Stoney Meadows Winnie (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Winston ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Snow Queen) Third, Lazeland Kennels' Madcap Front and Center (by Ch. Great Circle Skibbereen ex Great Circle Tosca)

Bred By Exhibitor Bitches, one shown, Lazeland Kennels' Limelight O'Lazeland (by Ch. Surfrider O'Lazeland ex Ch. Whipoo's White Luster)

American Bred Bitches, two shown. First, Kathryn & Scott Fields' Avaunt Cassandra (by Oberon of Briskways ex Ch. Whipoo's Avon Jessica) Second, Tony Swistak's Mercury (by Ch. Red Letter O' Lazeland ex Harbridge Lovely Lady)

Open Bitches, five shown. First, Mrs. W. P. Wear's Stoney Meadows Beauty Queen (by Ch. Stoney Meadows Winston ex Ch. Stoney Meadows Snow Queen) Second, Paul Sykes' Eyleland Pianissimo (by Ch. Eyleland Cinnamon Roll ex Eyleland Dorothy) Third, Barbara Eyles' Eyleland Hannah (by Stoney Meadows Epic ex Ch. Great Circle Hester) Fourth, Marion H. Woodcock’s Silver Song of Suntan (by Meander Magna Carta ex Wing Foot Molly)

Best Of Winners to Stoney Meadows Beauty Queen.

Specials, eight shown, Ch. Whipoo's White Chiffon, Ch. Seven League Skybluepink, Ch. Eyleland Red Mack, Ch. Eyleland Crescendo, Ch. Seven League Songbird, Ch. Hollypark Hobgoblin, Ch. Hollypark Highland Fling, Ch. Legend O'Lazeland.

Best Of Breed to Stoney Meadows Beauty Queen.
Best Opposite Sex to Eyleland Henry.


FROM ENGLAND
Mrs. M. B. Garrish, Surrey, England, writes:

I should like to tell you how much I enjoy The Whippet News and to congratulate you on an excellent and interesting publication.

I thought perhaps you might like to have my critique on the Whippets at Crufts this year which I had the great pleasure of judging. The entry of 266 with 149 exhibits was a record for Crufts and was the top entry of the Hound Group. The Whippet Best of Freed, Samarkands Greenbrae Tarragon, owned by —r. James and bred by Mrs. Yerburgh is by Ch. Laguna Limelight ex Ch. Greenbrae Laguna Lucia and came in 2nd in the Hound Group which was a hot one.

You will note that your compatriot, Betty Fell, won the Bitch Puppy class whilst another which she bred in the same litter was 2nd in the same class of 25.

Crufts critique....Thank you exhibitors for giving me such a wonderful entry and for turning up with your dogs in the awful weather conditions...I thought the presentation of the dogs generally was excellent though several were shy and lacked ring training. I noticed more light eyes than one used to see and I do urge most strongly that breeders should pay more attention to ears; several were coarse and heavy and a very high percentage flew their ears. These faults detract very much from the true Whippet expression. Puppy movement as well as older dogs was uncertain in many cases, but in the case of the younger dogs I did not penalize too much as I appreciate that it has been very difficult to give one's dogs their usual and necessary exercise. The general quality of the breed was extremely high and has certainly not deteriorated since last I judged.... Open D; I thought this class one of the highlights, full of beautiful dogs. 1 James' Samarkands Greenbrae Tarragon, C.C. & Best of Breed & 2nd in Hound Group; it gave me great pleasure to go over this beautiful dog, he is teeming with quality, has great presence & is a natural showman, moved perfectly; I am well aware of the talk about his size but in my opinion his outstanding qualities completely outweigh this objection; a really grand dog... Open Bt 1 Argyle's Harque to Rosa, put down to the minute, a graceful & high quality one, her movement was excellent, she had drive behind and reached right out in front, though she has not e. gay tail she does tend to carry it a trifle high but this criticism is perhaps rather straining at gnats; won the C.C.


Mrs. C. E. Francis, London, England, writes:

April 13. Herewith the news of the Whippet Club championship show on April 6, door for a long time and has had an awful lot of bad luck, being mauled by a Greyhound. He already holds 12 Reserve 0.0.s.

NOTICE

Material for the Whippet News is always welcome from all readers and all the news that is received is presented with a minimum of editing, so as to retain the individual style of the writer. Each issue of the Whippet News is the result of the material sent in by the readers and reflects the interest of the readers. It is not the policy of the editor to assign, reserve or give space in the Whippet News for any article, subject or topic.

When submitting material for the News, please typewrite or print plainly, especially proper names.
The opinions expressed in the Whippet News are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the editor or the American Whippet Club.

Notice — The Whippet News offers the right to other publications to reprint material from the News without writing for specific permission, providing a credit line is given.

A reminder to all readers to send in your letters, news, kennel reports, show results, racing news, club news, new champions, opinions and ads. Send in your contribution any time, whenever you have the time to do so. No need to wait for the reminder post card or deadline. Your material will be held for the next available issue. There are six issues of the Yews a year, February, April, June, August, October and December. Ads and photographs are presented in the order in which they are received.

Deadline for the June issue is June 15 (by postmark). Advertising rates:
$1 for $1/4  page, $2 for a half page, $4 for a full page. Please send remittance with copy. Pictures: e8 a page plus cost of printing. There is a photographic process for reproducing pictures at less cost than making cuts. Cost - from $8, depending on amount of copy. Send glossy prints.

Mail to: The Whippet News c/o E. L. Jacobs Mahomet, Illinois


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WHIPPET
STANDARD OF THE BREED

General Appearance - The Whippet should be a dog of moderate size, very alert, that can cover a maximum of distance with a minimum of lost motion, a true sporting hound. Should be put down in hard condition but with no suggestion of being muscle-bound.
Head - Long and lean, fairly wide between the ears, scarcely perceptible stop,
good length of muzzle which should be powerful without being coarse. Nose entirely black.
Ears - Small, fine in texture, thrown back and folded. Semipricked when at attention. Gay ears are incorrect and should be severely penalized.
Eyes - Large   intelligent, round in shape and dark hazel in color, must be at
least as dark as the coat color. Expression should be keen and alert. Light yellow or oblique eyes should be strictly penalized. A sulky expression and lack of alertness to be considered most undesirable.
Teeth - White, strong and even. Teeth of upper jaw should fit closely over the lower. An undershot mouth shall disqualify.
Neck - Long and muscular, well-arched and with no suggestion of throatiness, widening gradually into the shoulders. Must not have any tendency to a "ewe" neck.
Shoulders - Long, well laid back with long, flat muscles. Loaded shoulders are a very serious fault.
Brisket - Very deep and strong, reaching as nearly as possible to the point of the elbow. Ribs well sprung but with no suggestion of barrel shape. Should
fill in the space between the forelegs so that there is no appearance of a hollow between them.
Forelegs   Straight and rather long, held in line with the shoulders and not set
under the body so as to make a forechest. Elbows should turn neither in nor out and move freely with the point of the shoulder. Fair amount of bone, which should carry right down to the foot. Pasterns strong.
Feet - Must be well formed with strong, thick pads and well-knuckled-up paws. A thin, flat, open foot is a serious fault.
Hindquarters - Long and powerful, stifles well bent, hocks well let down and close to the ground. Thighs broad and muscular, the muscles should be long and flat. A steep croup is most undesirable.
Back - Strong and powerful, rather long with a good, natural arch over the loin creating a definite tuck-up of the underline but covering a lot of ground.
Tail - Long and tapering, should reach to a hipbone when drawn through between the hind legs. Must not be carried higher than the top of the back when moving.
Coat - Close, smooth and firm in texture.
Color - Immaterial.
Size - Ideal height for dogs, 19 to 22 inches; for bitches, 18 to 21 inches. These are not intended to be definite limits, only approximate.
Gait - Low, free moving and smooth, as long as is commensurate with the size of
the dog. A short, mincing gait with high knee action should be severely penalized.
Disqualifications
Undershot mouth.
Approved November 9, 1955


Appraxin Kennel Reports Calvin G. Perry
Mr. & Mrs. Louis L. Doyle
April 13, 1963 Pownal, Maine

Now that the Mid-Western Specialty and International are over, we wish to congratulate all the winners and say how pleased we were with the quantity and quality of the entries.

Spring has finally come to Maine and the dogs and people alike are really rejoicing. We read sympathetically. Wendy Howell's and Betty Fell's descriptions of winter overseas. There were times during the last few months that I thought I would never see bare ground again. However, the only snow left now is in the woods, and the crocuses have been blooming bravely for the last two weeks.

We have a litter of spring puppies by Ch. Seven League Skybluepink out of Stoney Meadows Aurora (litter sister to Stoney Meadows Hell's Bells). There are three males, white with grey-fawn head markings and two bitches, one white with grey spots, and one grey with white collar and feet. I have the litter and dam in a play-pen in the kitchen and enjoy watching their daily progress. Our Siamese cat is also fascinated by the pups and curls right up in the play-pen with the whole family, disturbing no one. A wonderful commentary on temperament all around, I think.

Since becoming interested in Whippets a few short years ago, one of my greatest pleasures in connection with the breed has been meeting and corresponding with the Whippet fanciers. I have found them to be without exception charming, courteous and helpful. Therefore, this raging controversy over Walter Wheeler's article has both shocked and disappointed me. I do hope that in the future more people will follow Doris Wear's calm and carefully thought out manner of rebuttal if they happen to disagree with an article in the News.

Cal would like to take this opportunity to thank D. R. Motch for selling him Skubluepink who finished with some very nice wins. Since being shown in Specials, "Mr. Ed" continues to prove his worth. He is delightful to have around the house and is showing great promise as a stud dog. Thank you, Bobby.

We would like to remind Whippet fanciers from other sections of the country that the New England summer circuit shows will be coming up fairly soon. There will be a A. W. C. supported show in Portsmouth, N. H. in mid-July, Mansfield, superintendent. We in the area look forward to seeing you there:


John H. Berger Reports
April, 1963
Marysville, Ohio

We thought the Chicago Specialty very exciting and the general quality of both show and race dogs much improved over our first visit three years ago.

The conformation classes were great. Saw several that I could make room for -­this was also true in the race classes. I love to look at a good one. It doesn't necessarily have to be a winner.

We were congratulated by so many people after the races — some old friends and also people I don't remember seeing before. I want to make it very clear they were congratulating me and I am grateful, but it is the breeders that deserve at least 90% of the credit, also for the very game puppy we raced last year. The potential has to be there or you can't develop it. Training alone won't make a game one from a "donkey" -- ask Mr. Pegram. I believe it was Jack Dempsey who said "If a man can take my training I will make Me a champion."

 To me it will always be the conscientious breeder that makes a breed, not necessarily the judge or the showman. The Whippets raced at Chicago attest the skill of some of the older breeders.

Most of you have seen the clown races. I wonder how many saw the very nice person who waited patiently until our races were over, then politely asked Gene and I if she could race her two dogs? Gene agreed to pull the lure and she to slip them as they were much too big for our boxes. This was an old breed noted for their great courage and coursing stamina. One collapsed about half way up the track. It looked like a good field Beagle could have beaten the other. This would have been funny except for the look of chagrin on this gal's face as she slowly walked them off the track. I think this demonstrates that you do have to race or course your dogs in competition to check on their character and stamina. The par mutual dash system that pleases the betting public is not the answer. Most any Whippet can do 200 yards. If you are really interested in getting to a game one you have to go several heats with short rest periods. This, of course, would be conditioned dogs. It's cruel to put a game dog in top competition without condition. In closing, I have bred several litters, came up with nothing. Not mad at any A.   C. members. As for judges, I even like 01' Waxie. He told me about my little dog's bad shoulders - otherwise I might not have raced her and found she can beat dogs almost twice her size.


Canesco Kennel Reports
Samuel H. Scott
April 10, 1963
Stokton, California

First I'd like to express my thanks to Mr. Wheeler for starting the whole discussion of judging. It isn't that I agree with him, for I don't; but I approve wholeheartedly of open discussion. It is this sort of thing that makes the News consistently interesting.

At this time I would like to offer my two cents worth in the form of an adaptation of an idea that has been stirring in my mind for a number of years. I grant that there are exhibitors who have little regard for the breed, but who must win at
all costs. These people, of course, will play politics, will try to discuss dogs with judges while in the ring, and will use any and every little device in or out of the book to achieve their purpose. These people, fortunately, are such a small minority in our breed that they have not damaged the overall spirit of good sportsmanship which has prevailed as long as we have had Whippets. I also admit that in the past ten years or so we have observed two judges who convinced us that their actions left much to be desired in the area of ethics. Even more fortunately, these apparent bad apples are also overwhelmingly outnumbered by the good apples in the barrel. You may be sure that if we reach the point where we can say, as Mr. Wheeler quotes,"....I do not think exhibitors want honest judging. They prefer
a game of power politics with the dogs as pawns....", you will have seen the last of us or our dogs at dog shows. In that case the game would not be worth playing. Now to my suggestion. I think that two things are desirable. 1. Some sort of compromise between the rather cumbersome English system of writing detailed critiques and our own system of not knowing what a judge really thinks of our dogs. 2. Some way to keep the details of the standard before the eyes of the multi-breed judges. I do believe that many judges, being only human, allow portion of the standard to slip their minds. Examples of this: An All-Rounder who has judged Best In Show at the Garden, at Chicago and other prestige shows who remarked to me, "Why is it that you people import English dogs of the correct size and immediately breed pups that are too big?" Or the judge who recently remarked that he liked Whippets with "lots of roach". Or the judge who said that he liked Whippet that were broad in head and put up a dog whose head bore a marked resemblance to
a Bull Terrier. Or the many who will put up the hackneyed, oversized Italian Greyhound types that are anything but a true sporting hound. My idea is embodied in the following check list. If the judge would be willing to make 17 check marks on this list, each check mark representing a paragraph from the standard, and if this check list could be given to the exhibitor after the judging, we would have an opinion of the dog. Isn't it possible that a novice exhibitor who has a fine dog, but who fails to place in his first couple of shows will give up when he should persevere? Conversely, isn't it possible that a person with a dog of less than first quality will waste his money showing the dog simply because his dog won a point at its first show because of lack of good competition? Wouldn't we all welcome the opinion of most judges, an unbiased, unemotional opinion? The check list would also serve the purpose of keeping the standard before the eyes of the judges. By printing those sentences which I have typed in capital letters in bold face type, the indicated faults could be brought to the eye and mind of the judge. Many judges know standards thoroughly, but I suspect that there are judges who cannot remember the details of the standards of all the breeds they judge and who hesitate to open the book in the ring for fear that some exhibitor will think that they do not know their business. I, for one, would welcome the use of such a check-list. Perhaps if the membership reaction were favorable to such an idea it could be tested by the judges who need it least, but whose opinions we certainly value most. I mean, of course, the judges at the Whippet Specialties. With good ring stewards I think that the use of the list would not slow down judging at all. If the idea were to be tried out in such a fashion and reaction were favorable, perhaps judges at all-breed shows, at least some of them, would be willing to go along with the idea.

 
Excellent
Adequate
Lacking
GENERAL APPEARANCE: Should be a dog of moderate size, very alert, that can cover a maximum of distance with a minimum of lost motion, a true sporting hound. Should be put down in hard condition but with no suggestion of being muscle-bound      
HEAD: Long and lean, fairly wide between the ears, scarcely perceptible stop, good length of muzzle which should be powerful without being coarse. Nose entirely black.      
EARS: Small, fine in texture, thrown back and folded. Semipricked when at attention. GAY EARS ARE INCORRECT AND SHOULD BE SEVERELY PENALIZED      
EYES: Large, intelligent, round in shape and dark hazel in color, must be at least as dark as the coat color. Expression should be keen and alert. LIGHT YELLOW OR OBLIQUE EYES SHOULD BE STRICTLY PENALIZED. A sulky expression and lack of alertness to be considered most undesirable.      
TEETH: White, strong and even. Teeth of upper jaw should fit closely over the lower. AN UNDERSHOT MOUTH SHALL DISQUALIFY. NECK: Long and muscular, well-arched and with no suggestion of throatiness, widening gradually into the shoulders. Must not have any tendency to a "ewe" neck.      
SHOULDERS: Long, well laid back with long
flat muscles. LOADED SHOULDERS ARE A VERY SERIOUS FAULT.
     
BRISKET: very deep and strong, reaching as nearly as possible to the point of the elbow. Ribs well sprung but with no suggestion of barrel shape. Should fill the space between the forelegs so that there is no appearance
of a hollow between them.
     
FORELEGS: Straight and rather long, held in line with the shoulders and not set under the body so as to make a forechest. Elbows should turn neither in nor out and move freely with the point of the shoulder. Fair amount of bone, which should carry right down to the foot. Pasterns strong:.      
HINDQUARTERS: Long and powerful, stifles well bent, hocks well let down and close to the ground. Thighs broad and muscular, the muscles should be long and flat. A .KEEP CROUP IS HOST UNDESIRABLE.      
BACK: Strong and powerful, rather long with a good, natural arch over the loin creating a definite tuckup of the underline but covering. a lot of ground.      
TAIL: Long and tapering, should reach to a hipbone when drawn through between the hind legs. rust not be carried higher than the top of the back when moving:.      
COLOR: Immaterial      
SIZE: Ideal height for dogs, 19 to 22 in; for bitches, 18 to 21 in. THESE ARE NOT INTENDED TO BE DEFINITE LIMITS, ONLY APPROXIMATE.      
GAIT: Low, free moving and smooth, as long as is commensurate with the size of the dog. A SHORT, MINCING GAIT WITH HIGH KNEE ACTION SHOULD BE SEVERELY PENALIZED.      
       
Judge
(If these were printed, they'd go on one page easily, of course.)
     

Eyleland Kennel Reports Ralph & Barbara Eyles April, 1963
Antioch, Illinois

At the request of Eugene Jacobs to do the Gazette column, I excerpted an article from The Book of the Dog (Vesey - Fitzgerald, London, 1948) which I had found interesting, Now, after conversations with several Whippet people who do not subscribe to the Gazette, it might be of general interest to those who only receive the Whippet News. The article applies to Greyhounds but inasmuch as the Whippet standard is practically word for word the same as the Greyhound standard, it could apply equally to Whippets. It is as follows:

"The English Greyhound exhibits a model of elegance and a combination of symmetric proportions, probably unrivalled by any other animal but the race horse. The perfection of the mechanism for speedy progression is apparent throughout his structure.

It is frequently argued that Greyhounds course and race successfully in all shapes and sizes and that good looks are no asset in dogs required for sport; classic examples are then quoted of dogs who were not outstanding good lookers but who were brilliant performers in the field or on the track.

Whilst it is a fact that there have been, and are, successful dogs of all shapes and sizes, it is also a fact that a malformed dog could never be a success. The conformation required in a Greyhound has been built up in the course of the long history of the breed, to enable them to carry out their work as efficiently as possible and with a minimum of fatigue.

Considering the requirements in the perfect Greyhound; speed is undoubtly first in importance, but speed alone would be useless without a well balanced and well coupled body, which enables the dog to make sudden turns and twists without effort and without losing balance. Stamina is also an important consideration and for this the body must be formed as to afford the maximum room for heart and lungs and every limb must be built for soundness. Size is a factor governed by speed and balance.

In the earliest book on sport printed in English - The Poke of St. Albans, first published in 1486 - we find a description of the perfect Greyhound, which, when analyzed, gives a picture of the ideal Greyhound to this day. The writer of The Boke says: -'A Grehund shuld be heded like a Snake and necked lyke a Drake. Foted lyke a Kat, Syded lyke a Bream. Chyned lyke a Beme.' The similies are exceedingly apt, even if somewhat exaggerated, and give us an excellent picture of how the perfect Greyhound should be 'schapte'.

Taking the points in the same order as given by the old writers and commencing with the head; likening of the shape of the Greyhound's head to that of a snake is good - a long, narrow head broadening a little and flattened in the skull, giving plenty of brain room; well placed prominent eyes, bright and intelligent; the jaw strong with sound level teeth, no sign of cheekiness; the ears are, probably, the least important point in a Greyhound's make up, but there is little doubt that nicely folded ears, small and of fine texture, perfect the magnificent streamlined head of a well bred dog.

The neck lengthy, gracefully symmetrical and muscular without any tendency to throatiness, is an exceedingly beautiful feature and may well be likened to the graceful neck of a drake. On the length and flexibility of the neck depends the dog's ability to strike down the hare without checking his stride. The great authority Stonehedge lays down that in a well formed dog the measurement from the point of the nose to the junction of the head with the neck should be the same as the measurement from that junction to the front of the shoulder blade.

The shoulders are not described in the Poke of St. Albans, they should be long and oblique and well set back, muscular without being loaded.

The chine or back 'like a beam' part of the description is lovely; broad and squared up like a piece of axe trimmed timber is just what a Greyhound's beck should be, the broad square back showing enormous muscular development on each side of the spine. The chine must be strong and flexible; a strong back slightly arched at the loins to enable the hind legs to work straight backwards and forwards without any outward motion causing loss of maximum propelling power.

The 'sides of a bream', also, well describes the Greyhound; the chest is exceedingly deep and roomy in the front, giving plenty of lung space; the ribs nicely sprung but relatively flat sided to permit good set on and easy working of the shoulder blades in a straight line (A bream is a European fresh-water fish with relatively FLAT sides and a slightly arched back - B. Eyles)

A very old saying amongst horsemen is 'no hoof, no horse' and this is applicable to the Greyhound. The 'fote lyke a kat' is of the utmost importance as the concussion taken by the foot when at full gallop on hard going is terrific and a cat foot with the toes set well up, close together and well padded is essential to absorb shock. The perfect foot possessed by practically all cats describes the ideal to perfection. Such perfect feet are possessed by relatively few Greyhounds, hence the prevalence of 'track foot' amongst racing Greyhounds.

It is strange that our old descriptions do not include the legs, the most striking feature of the breed. Forelegs must be perfectly straight, muscular on the outside but flat on the inside; pasterns long and strong.

The hindquarters of the Greyhound are a perfect picture of colossal propelling power, and absolutely depict speed. The quarters must be wide and well let down, hocks forming a good angle and close to the ground. Any tendency of the legs to divert from a dead straight lateral line, such as out at elbow or cow hocks, is a damning fault. The movement must be entirely lateral, to gain the maximum propulsion power and minimum wind resistance.

The rat tail, that is, long and covered with smooth fine hair is a sign of quality and breeding, a bushy or excessively hairy tail shows the opposite: the tail is used as an aid to balance and it is essential that it should not be kinked. A fine coat signifies quality in a like manner to a fine tail."

Thus ends the applicable portion of the article, which we found most interesting. Most people know what a Whippet or Greyhound should look like but they don't know `THY they should look that way. For those who think that Whippets are Whippets and Greyhounds are Greyhounds and that the Whippet is not a scaled down Greyhound
and shouldn't look like one, may I briefly compare the standards of the two breeds?

Greyhound: Head - Long and narrow, fairly wide between the ears, scarcely perceptible stop, little or no development of nasal sinuses, good length of muzzle, which should be powerful without coarsness. Teeth very strong and even in front.

Whippet: Head - Long and lean, fairly wide between the ears, scarcely perceptible stop, good length of muzzle which should be powerful without being coarse. rose entirely black.

Greyhound: Ears - Small and fine in texture, thrown back and folded, except when excited, when they are semi pricked.

Whippet: Ears - Small, fine in texture, thrown back and folded. Semipricked when at attention. Gat ears are incorrect,...etc.

Greyhound: Eyes - Dark, bright, intelligent, indicating spirit.

Whippet: Eyes - Large, intelligent, round in shape,..etc. Expression keen and alerts ...etc.

Greyhound: Neck - Long, muscular, without throatiness, slightly arched, and widening gradually into the shoulders.

Whippet: Neck - Long and muscular, well arched and with no suggestion of throatiness, widening gradually into the shoulders....Etc.

Greyhound: Shoulders - Placed as obliquely as possible, muscular without being loaded.

Whippet: Shoulders - Long, well laid back with long flat muscles. Loaded shoulders are a VERY serious fault.

Greyhound: Forelegs - Perfectly straight, set well into the shoulder, neither turned in nor out, pasterns strong.

Whippet: Forelegs - Straight and rather long.., eta. Elbows should turn neither in nor out...,etc. Fair amount of bone...etc. Pasterns strong.

Greyhound: Chest — Deep, and as wide as consistent with speed, fairly we ribs.

Whippet Brisket — Very deep and strong...etc. Ribs well sprung but with no suggestion of barrel shape...etc.

Greyhound: Back — Muscular and broad, well arched.

Whippet : Back - Strong and powerful, rather long with a good natural arch over the loin.....covering a lot of ground.

Greyhound: Hindquarters — Long, very muscular and powerful, wide and well let down, well—bent stifles. Hocks well bent and rather close to ground, wide but straight fore and aft.

Whippet : Hindquarters — Long and powerful, stifles well bent, hocks well let down and close to the ground. Thighs broad and muscular.

The feet differ a little but both coats are to be "close, smooth and firm in texture", and both tails are "long and tapering" and the color for both is "immaterial". Very interesting, what? We find it so.


Dorothea Frames Reports
April, 1963
Sunland, California

The trip to Chicago on the Flying Tiger Air Freight Lines was comfortable and most inexpensive. It would have been more comfortable if they hadn't preserved the huge load of fresh strawberries with freezing temperatures, but we survived on flat bunks with no place to sit and a 4 inch porthole for sight seeing. The dogs were all right with us and were very comfortable, bedded down in carpets of torn paper. Marion Woodcock, Bob Hastings and I wore all the warm clothes we could and still felt the chill that preserved the strawberry load.

The Specialty was of course marvelous. I finally saw so many of the Whippets I'd been reading about. Everyone was so friendly and kind that the transition wasn't really so great. I intend to return next year. (probably with the spring strawberries again).

The racing program was by far the most professionally handled that I've ever attended. Gene Jacobs is a master with the lure and Mr. Pegram great on the loudspeaker.

We had a great time visiting the Eyles and Steinbergs and saw the lovely countryside where they are raising their dogs, complete with race tracks and built in rabbits. If it weren't so cold for California sun lovers, I'd move tomorrow.
On my way to the Sacramento show now where Dr. Wm. Haupt is judging Whippets. A good entry of 13 — should be the first show with any od last fall's puppies entered.


Great Circle Kennel Reports
Wendell T. Howell
April, 1963
Co. Waterford, Eite

What very excellent pictures of the Fell's Kennel in the last W. R. Having seen the kennel I can only report that it is perfectly fabulous - beautifully planned and built, roomy and warm. I have just completed a kennel building here in a far smaller scale. It is the marvel if this countryside however, as nothing like it has ever been seen. It is the usual thing here to see a most valuable greyhound appearing out of a dark and dirty made over (hastily) pig pen - and the idea of insulation and damp courses (?? editor) for dogs is a novelty. Since this kennel was designed and started in the depths of a most awful winter it is possibly a little overbuilt in some respects, but the Whippets appreciate it and the pocket­book will recover. Though I have as yet no real house myself - it wasn't as crazy as it seems to build first for the dogs. They are comfortable and out of the way of house building - and the worry of having them shut up in a room with a large open fire and paraffin heaters is no more. That was a nightmare - and I was never comfortable leaving them for fear of sparks, rotting logs or upset heaters.

The Patrick's Dog Show in Dublin brought out nineteen Whippets on a lovely spring day. The judge was Dr. R. J. May. Timmy Cranley, of Tipperary town won the large Novice Class with his T. C. Brutus (by Scot ex Xenia) and G. C. Wise Child (by Wingedfoot Domenic ex Tantivvey Viscaria) got the bitch green star. The dog green star went to the north with Luicvtuian Moonraker from Belfast.

Inspired by the better weather all the girls seem to be coming in season. (thank heavens for the kennel). G. C. Xenia is bred to Wingedfoot Domenic and 1. C. Holiday is having a final fling with a very nice young dog of Mrs. McKay's breeding, vacationing here for a few weeks with a neighbor, his owner, the Duchess of Devonshire. Neither his owner nor I know his breeding, but Mrs. McKay will soon enlighten us - and he's good enough to take a chance on - supplying as well a desperately needed outcross. My Ligonier pup is not yet old enough to use, unfortunately. With this pup (ex Wisechild) the old question of size has come back to haunt me. He might have come straight from any of several noted kennels in Virginia - a thing I can't possibly blame on Ligonier. My size problem has been going the other way for so long (too small) that I had almost forgotten that My old friends G. C. Valiant, G. C. Swiftwater Bill and many more, of course still stand behind all my breeding. With the usual Flukiness of breeding - of course this had to be a single puppy - if it had been a litter - oh well - who knows!

I've recently heard from Mr. Young, who sounds as chipper as ever, in spite of the bad luck of recently losing his dog Whippet. Also I've received a welcome and newsy letter from an eminent Whippet breeder in the middle west - who deplores the fact of all the recent recriminations in W. N. Of course he is perfectly right. It is a pity to let a wonderful dog paper develop into a sounding board for acrimony.

So let me issue an invitation to Mr. Notch and Mr. Wheeler and anyone else upon whose toes I've recently trod - to visit me and the dogs in Ireland - pin on a Shamrock, and have a drop or two of Paddy. Needless to say the invitation applies as well to anyone whose toes are in perfect condition, to whom it may be more welcome. Good luck and good racing to everyone at Chicago.


Whipoo Kennel Reports Sibyl & Gene Jacobs April, 1963
Mahomet, Illinois

We received a very nice letter from Mrs. H. Hugenholtz van der Velde, Den Dolder Holland. She stated how highly interesting the article on training a puppy for the races was to her as she has a very promising dog now and she wants to try this method. She reports that in Holland they are rather upset about the judging now abroad, as they put the accent on teeth, missing premolars, which is not mentioned in the standard, as a very serious fault, with gait and character not mattering so much. She heard that even in England they do not put so much stress on gait anymore and tolerate the Italian way and feels they will be sorry in the end. She notes with interest that with the racing Whippets one hardly ever sees the hackney gait: They had some very good racing Whippets in Holland last year. The best dog is Swiss and runs as fast as a good Greyhound! Right now all exhibitions and racing is prohibited in Holland as they had some rabies cases in Sept. & Oct. The dogs are not allowed to run free, though people do as they did before , open the front door and dogs go where they want. Controlled dog activity is not allowed, which Mrs. van der Velde says does not seem reasonable, especially since those Rabies cases started with such let-them-run-in-the-streets-dogs. However, she says in the end they will have racing and exhibitions again if they only have patience.

Jayne Langdon, 507 Central Ave., Alameda, California, would like to have a copy of the schedule converting racing times from seconds into miles per hour, that was published some time ago in the '.'Whippet News. If anyone has an extra schedule, please send it to her.

We received the following letter from Yip & Tuck Collier, Brooksville, Florida:

The boss showed is our names in the last Whippet News. We were quite elated. The boss reads every word of each issue and they find their place an the magazine rack which does lend dignity to it - so he says.

He says he wishes 'yo-all' would come down to Florida and he will give you enough room for two tracks, regulation size, or better yet 30 acres for rambles through the timber of Magnolia, Pine Quince and Oaks. But we warn you if any pup gets to digging in the Azalia or Camelias or under the Dogwood, Figs and Roses, he will wad up a newspaper. Vie are sure scared of a folded newspaper.

And for lures. You will have to manufacture some for we have cleaned up the place of anything that moves, and only when some strange varmit strays into the fenced acreage do we have a party.

Now the boss says neither one of us would catch the judge's eye in the show ring, nor would we abide by formalities on the track but for brains he would put us against any of the Chs. We tackle anything and have rid the place and keep it free from snakes, rats, skunks, possum coon and bob cats as large or larger than we are. The only thing we haven't cleaned up are the squirrels. They breed too fast up in the trees that we try to climb but can't.

The boss says we are gentlemen in the house; we don't know strangers and get a bit too friendly sometimes. We had a fight and we would have eaten each other up when we were a little over a year old, but the boss paddled our behinds with a newspaper and now we are inseparable, eat out of a common pan, catch bones and bread and rubber balls in the air, retrieve and 1,000 other things people claim their pooches do. We taught ourselves all these trix.--Have we proved our brains are superior -- if not better come down and we will prove it. In the meantime, keep the News headed this way. The boss joins us in our kindest regards".


Windsprite Whippets Report Walter A. Wheeler, Jr. April, 1963
Weston, Mass.

I wish to thank Mr. William E. Fields for his well written commentary on Showing Dogs Incognito. This article in no place criticizes judges, nor does it shout "corruption". It merely suggests one of various ways in which our system of judging can be improved as far as impartiality is concerned. Mr. Field's treatment of objectivity and the judging of handling abilities rather than the dogs themselves should be required reading for AKC delegates. No matter how honest or expert a judge may be, so long as he can recognize an owner or handler before him in the ring, he cannot make a technically objective decision between the dogs.

Mrs. Wear's article on the training and preparation of the show Whippet is a delight. Perhaps she should have advised the novitiate about faking in the ring. Some call it handling. The blatant manipulation of the show Whippet is a laughing matter for other fanciers behind our backs. This routine of jabbing up the loin, pulling the immobilized animal forward and downward to create the illusion of shoulder layback, rear angulation, sweeping topline and long neck, while hiding the head within the hands, is indeed fascinating to watch, but sound judges see through this deception and give the nod to the better specimen of innate, natural quality, shown without open faking. Such over-handling may be one reason for all handling being prohibited in France!

My thanks to Mrs. Wear for taking the time to comment so thoughtfully on my article. What she writes about dogs, and her philosophy in the sport is both valid and worthwhile, however, may I vindicate my reference to flower and poultry shows. Were Mrs. Wear acquainted with some of the exhibitors at Boston's recent Camellia show, had she visited their extensive greenhouses, glanced over the payroll for the necessary corps of full time gardeners, and checked the overhead for such a pastime, she might not have referred to "cheaply" breeding lower forms of life. A Camellia, for instance, takes from five to seven years to bloom from seed (a generation being some three to five times longer than a dog's) and its buds develop slowly for to six to nine months before the long awaited show bloom opens. The very professional science of producing, conditioning, selecting, storing, preserving, arranging and presenting the blossoms for judging makes the road work conditioning of a show Whippet and its grooming appear simple.

This season, Boston held its 50th Annual Dog Show, but its 134th Annual Camellia Show. In the latter, a school teacher submitted six pampered entries amongst the hundreds of impressive blossoms from the traditional Brahmin exhibitors, including the permanently endowed Gardner Museum. With these six entries raised in a hobby greenhouse, the interloper won four first and a second. This might never happen in a dog show. Camellia entries are completely anonymous.

The "Men's Camellia Club of Shreveport, Louisiana, holds an annual show of several days duration, attracting 12,000 entries and 50,000 spectators. The whole town is involved in a truly community project. The Shreveport Dog Show in 1961 had only 183 entries. Why the interest in the Camellia show? Why the disinterest in the dog show? One reason: the Camellia show achieves equity with anonymous entries.

This season Boston held its 114th Annual Poultry Show as compared to its 50th Dog Show. Poultry breeds have been bred to precise, written standards since publication in 1873 by the American Poultry Association, the country's first livestock organization. The breeders' feat of changing the 60 egg per year barnyard fowl into the 300 egg per year record layer of today is astounding. Evidently, Mrs. Wear does not know that most successful exhibitors of poultry actually train their birds to show properly for strangers, namely the judge and official stewards. If chickens can thus be conditioned, surely our dogs can master the knack of showing well on their own, with a stranger holding the lead. In the standard—bred poultry industry and the Camellia show circuit, there are careers and fortunes in the balance. These exhibitors insist on anonymity during competition.

Actually, Mrs. Wear gives credence to our objections to the present unethical dog judging setup when she states, "Few are the times I genuinely feel I've been robbed in a political sense, but I will admit to having, on occasion, won over more worthy dogs merely by dint of being a better known kennel owner." With an ethical judging setup, this would never be permitted. In her own words, Mrs. Wear proves the point of my article, and, in effect, seems to announce frankly that her own position is politically secure.

A devoted breeder is interested in improving the breed itself, not necessarily augmenting its number of wins in the groups or BIS. The breed point wins should be the most important prizes at a show (in spite of Mrs. Wear's disdain for "a few points") and should indicate the closeness to perfection of the winners. The group wins merely reflect a judge's opinion as to whether "Squirt" is a better Chihuahua than is "Fluff" a Pomeranian.... or, as Mrs. Wear suggests, in some case: it could reflect his opinion of owner, handler or breeder.

Mrs. Wear's example of herself and her first show dog proves anything except her own contention. Through no fault of her own, she was endowed with "influence" the first time she stepped into the ring. Her dog was an outstanding one, far above his competition. Incidentally, when I saw him, he showed naturally with­out needing any poking, pulling or pressing. Average show conditions produce competition of more even and average quality.

Mrs. Wear strikes the keynote of Showing Dogs Incognito when she says, "the only suggestion I can offer for a cure is a complete overhaul of human nature." This, of course, is facetious, but we can change the system of judging in which human nature must operate. Look to other countries! Look to other lore established Forms or competition!


The Whippet Club of New South Wales
Australia
March 16, 1963


A line to thank you for the December 1962 issue of The 'Whippet News. This is really an excellent paper and is read with much interest. Particularly the article by Louis Pegram on racing the Whippet, which I am taking the liberty of reproducing in two parts in our Club Newssheet, for I feel it will be of great interest to our members here.

We have only just gone into the field of racing over the last two years, and in the past have held meetings in conjunction with the Afghan Hound Club of N. S. '1. The trouble was finding a suitable track - in the early stages, we had the use of a Greyhound circular training track where the "bunny" whined along a rail on the inside of the track. We found this most unsatisfactory, as the persistent whine or shriek of the electric hare, long before it reached the level of the dogs at the starting barrier, nearly sent them mad. So much so, that they were exhausted long before they came to race: Fortunately, last year, we located a straight track with the drag lure, as described by Mr. Pegram. This has been found to be much more satisfactory and the dogs are racing much better. We did have a Whippet only race meeting arranged for a fortnight ago, however it had to be cancelled due to bad weather. This was a bit of bad luck, because we had managed to get some publicity in the local paper.

Last year we were asked to put on an exhibition at a south east city Agricultural show. That is, Whippets Afghans and Greyhounds, with the finalists in each breed to compete against each other. Well it came to the three finalists and they flew off to an excellent start. About 50 yards from the post, the Greyhound halted to have a smell at something interesting— the Whippet flew past — pulled up smartly and joined in — followed by a similar procedure from the Afghan. With a crowd of over 7,000 and this race exhibition to be our pride and joy - you can well imagine how we felt:

At the moment we are all preparing for the Sydney Royal Show, which is our big event of the year. This is the biggest show of its kind in Australia, and probably the Southern Hemisphere, and covers just about everything from cattle to bees, trade exhibitions, produce, horticulture etc. The dog section this year includes 3165 dogs which is a record entry.

The Whippet entry this year is down below that of 1962. Our members are in the main, scattered throughout TT. S. W. with many on farming properties, so that it is not always convenient for them to attend the capital city shows.

At Easter, we have another Specialty Show, with the Afghans and Basset Hounds. This will be the fourth championship show conducted jointly by the three Clubs.


With Best Wishes from "down under",

Max Krumbeck, Hon. Secretary


THE MAIL BAG

Pamela Arthur, British Columbia, Canada, writes, April 6, 1965: I'm afraid our plans for Chicago fell through because the two dogs I was planning on bringing, met up with a car and were quite seriously injured. One had over 50 stitches in a foreleg and the other suffered concussion and minor bumps and bruises. I found the Whippet collar (wide) of one of the dogs ripped in half at the widest part, laying in the road, so I think that I'm very lucky to have the poor things alive. I have put up a trophy for our Club "The Western Gazehound Club" to be presented to the leading Whippet of the year in Canada. The trophy is called "The Rockabye Rosebowl".

We have started racing now and meet twice a month in Vancouver. We have over 25 Whippets in training. Our big day has now confirmed as June 2nd. Has anyone got any suggestions as to how we could plan a programme for about 2 - 2 1/2 hours of racing with about 25 dogs and end up with a champion racer? I think it is going to be quite a task. With prize money in every class we are going to find it even harder.

Mrs. Howard Berry, Hamilton, Ohio, writes, March 25, 1965; I am still reading the Feb. issue, it is just wonderful...We should have received said issue a couple weeks earlier with all its information regarding grooming, training, racing, etc. The Backman's came up and we dashed up to the Springfield Ohio dog show, took three Whippets — came home with 2 Blues and 1 third, our debut showing dogs. It was great fun. Next time we hope not to be so green — shall get more pointers from your Feb. issue.

In January we bought Becuna from John Berger. She won last year at Chicago, bred in the purple, all champions, by Lazeland Kennels in Virginia. Hoped t' take her to Chicago but can't get away, however, we hope to show and plan to show at Champaign, sounds like fun.

Mrs. C. E. Francis, London England, writes, March 11, 1965: Congratulations on your award from Dog World, it was really deserved and earned. The News and articles are always of help and interest to newcomers and experienced dog breeders alike. Your Whippet Yews Issue 6 arrived last week. Such a very helpful article on racing training from Louis Pegram. I am offering this copy through the breed notes to any interested owner who would like to borrow it. I should mention that muzzles are not used very much in this country for Whippets although Greyhounds always use them. Also, in this country the Whippet is often owned by the working class man, as in my own case, this curtails the amount of traveling one is able to do. I have six Whippets at present, all good runners and it is my husband and my ambition to produce a top quality show Whippet which is also a top racer. So far, Pearlie Girl is our nearest, at Crufts this year she was third in Graduate Bitch and Highly Commended in Open Bitch. Her racing last season was really top hole.

I am hoping for good results this year. Our new training session opens on March 17th at Potters Bar, Middlesex. Braeswood Racing Club will be starting their new season on March 24th. Several other Clubs all over the country are also starting up. However, I had a letter from Lancashire this morning about racing clubs up country and the writer says very many Whippets racing up there are not K. C. registered. Our Whippet Club Show will be on April 6th so I will try to give you a little of the results and comments the following day. Once again Best Wishes to all Whippeteers.

April 15, 1965: (Since these show results somehow were deleted in printing in the From England section, here they are again—Editor) Herewith the news of the Whippet Club championship Show on April 6th. This produced a new bitch c.c.. Lady Selway's Ballagan Annie Laurie, the dog c.c. went to Mrs. Odell's Shalfleet Swordsman. This dog has been knocking at the door for a long time and has had an awful lot of bad luck, being mauled by a Greyhound. He already holds 12 Reserve c.c.

This Easter my husband, dogs and I are in Norfolk for a few days holiday. This morning the dogs ran some hares on the old aerodrome and had some wonderful runs. My friend with whom we are staying has Jack Russell Terriers and this afternoon the dogs are going rabbiting. The terriers will rake the rabbits out and the Whippets catch them. The little terrier bitch went in after a vixen fox with young the other day. It has wonderful courage. Trust you and all Whippeteers have a very successful season.

Sam Hearn, Lawton, Oklahoma, writes, April 5, 1963: Would like to report from Blue Beaver Kennels that all is well in the Whippet end of the kennels. We are very well pleased with the way the Blue Beaver Whippets have accounted for themselves so far this spring show season. The Whippet entry is away up this season in the south, we have as high as 13 Whippets at the all breed shows, and more and more people are becoming interested in the breed. I believe in the near future, the Whippet will be coming to the front in our part of the country.

Margaret Olson, Scappoose, Oregon, writes, April 1, 1963: Our Whippets increased from two to six, but two of them have gone to new homes in St. Helens, Ore. We were only allowed 3 dogs in the city where we lived so we moved to the country which we think is better for dogs and children alike. Since we moved we have also squired 2 Beagles. White Acres Shanee took the Best of Breed at the Portland show on March 2, and only needs a few points to finish. The weather has been very nice for ducks but for humans end dogs alike it is awful wet.

We enjoy reading the Whippet News and wouldn't miss it for anything.

We received very sad news from England to say that Ch. Red Atom had passed away. Her pet name was Lady and she was just that in every respect.. Must close now as I have kennels to clean and hounds to feed. They are fed every day at 4 P/M. and if I am not on the dot they let me know about it.